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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

5 edition of Superplasticity in Metals, Ceramics and Intermetallics found in the catalog.

Superplasticity in Metals, Ceramics and Intermetallics

Merrilea J. Mayo

Superplasticity in Metals, Ceramics and Intermetallics

Symposium Held April 16-19, 1990, San Francisco, California, USA (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings)

by Merrilea J. Mayo

  • 282 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Materials Research Society .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Superplasticity,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Plastic properties,
  • Ceramics,
  • Materials For Engineering,
  • Congresses,
  • Metals

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsJ. Wadsworth (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages401
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8608759M
    ISBN 101558990852
    ISBN 109781558990852

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize recent work on superplastic behavior in ceramics and ceramic composites and comment on related work in intermetallics, geological materials, and nanophase materials. So far, only limited work has demonstrated superplastic behavior in tension in fine-grained, fully polycrystalline ceramics. Information is presented on irons, carbon and alloy steels, stainless steels, and powder metallurgy steels. The third part covers nonferrous alloys and special-purpose materials such as metal-matrix composites and structural intermetallics.

    Superplasticity — the ability of a material to sustain large plastic deformation — has been demonstrated in a number of metallic, intermetallic and ceramic systems. Conditions considered. A wide range of structural materials, including metals, intermetallics, and ceramics are presented. Some of the most recent advances, for example, high strain rate superplasticity, low temperature superplasticity, and the development of ultrafine‐grained materials for superplasticity .

      Superplasticity in Metals and Alloys, Ceramics and Intermetallics Superplasticity in Novel Materials: Bulk Metallic Glasses, TRIP/TWIP steels, High-Entropy Alloys and Metallic Heterostructures High Strain Rate / Low Temperature Superplasticity. An intermetallic (also called an intermetallic compound, intermetallic alloy, ordered intermetallic alloy, and a long-range-ordered alloy) is a type of metallic alloy that forms an ordered solid-state compound between two or more metallic elements. Intermetallics are generally hard and brittle, with good high-temperature mechanical properties. They can be classified as stoichiometric or.


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Superplasticity in Metals, Ceramics and Intermetallics by Merrilea J. Mayo Download PDF EPUB FB2

Observations of superplasticity in metals (including aluminum, magnesium, iron, titanium and nickel), ceramics (including monoliths and composites), intermetallics (including iron, nickel, and titanium base), and laminates are thoroughly described.

This is a valuable text for graduate students and researchers in materials science and by: The interest in superplasticity has increased due to the recent observations of this phenomenon in a wide range of materials, including some materials (such as nanocrystalline materials [], ceramics [,]metal matrix composites [], and intermetallics []) that are difficult to form by conventional forming.

The observations of superplasticity in metals (including aluminium, magnesium, iron, titanium and nickel), ceramics (including monoliths and composites), intermetallics (including iron, nickel, and titanium base), and laminates are thoroughly by: Observations of superplasticity in metals (including aluminum, magnesium, Ceramics and Intermetallics book, titanium and nickel), ceramics (including monoliths and composites), intermetallics (including iron, nickel, and titanium base), and laminates are thoroughly described.

This is a valuable text for graduate students and researchers in materials science and engineering. Interest in superplasticity is extremely high. The major areas include superplasticity in metals, ceramics, intermetallics, and composites. Superplasticity at very high strain rates (i.e., approximately –1 s −1) is an area of strong emphasis that is expected to lead to increased applications of superplastic-forming technology.

Historically, there has been no universally accepted. Superplasticity in Metals and Ceramics by T. Nieh,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(1). Superplasticity in Metals, Ceramics and Intermetallics Amiya K.

Mukherjee University of California, Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Materials Engineering, Davis, CA, USA, Cited by: Superplasticity is shown to be a universal phenomenon in materials ranging from metals and intermetallics to ceramics.

Superplastic deformation facilitates the production of materials with specifically chosen properties. Superplasticity in Metals and Ceramics (Cambridge Solid State Science Series) | T. Nieh, J. Wadsworth, O.

Sherby | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Abstract. Like conventional alloys, usually brittle intermetallic alloys (TiAl, Ti 3 Al, Ni 3 Al etc.) in a fine-grained condition under a certain temperature-strain rate intervals display superplastic behavior [–].

Phenomenological features like high elongation, low flow stress, high strain-rate sensitivity index and deformation mechanisms were found to be similar to those found in. superplastic deformation. The interest in Superplasticity has increased due to the recent observations of this phenomenon in a wide range of materials, including some materials (such as nanocrystalline materials [], ceramics [,], metal matrix composites [], and intermetallics []) that are difficult to form by conventional forming.

The observations of superplasticity in metals (including aluminium, magnesium, iron, titanium and nickel), ceramics (including monoliths and composites), intermetallics (including iron, nickel, and titanium base), and laminates are thoroughly described.

Superplasticity in metals, ceramics, and intermetallics: symposium held April, San Francisco, California, U.S.A. Interest in the phenomenon of superplasticity has been increasing steadily, both from the viewpoint of fundamental scientific understanding as well as of industrial application.

The scope of superplasticity has also broadened materials-wise, and now includes, in addition to metals: intermetallics, ceramics, bulk metallic glasses, nanostructured materials and composites.

Superplasticity is shown to be a universal phenomenon in materials ranging from metals and intermetallics to ceramics. Superplastic deformation facilitates the production of materials with specifically chosen properties.

This is illustrated using the examples of Mg- Al. The interest in superplasticity has increased due to the recent observations of this phenomenon in a wide range of materials, including some materials (such as nanocrystalline materials, ceramics, metal-matrix composites, and intermetallics) that are difficult to form by conventional forming processes.

Superplasticity is shown to be a universal phenomenon in materials ranging from metals and intermetallics to ceramics. Superplastic deformation facilitates the production of materials with specifically chosen properties.

This is illustrated using the examples of Mg- Al- and Ti-based commercial alloys, steels, and by: Volume is indexed by Thomson Reuters CPCI-S (WoS).Interest in the phenomenon of superplasticity has been increasing steadily over the past thirty-four years, both from the viewpoint of fundamental scientific understanding as well as of industrial application.

The scope of superplasticity has also broadened materials-wise, and now includes, in addition to metals: intermetallics, ceramics, bulk. ity in metals, ceramics, intermetallics, and composites.

Superplasticity at very high strain rates (i.e., approximatel y s"1) is an area of strong emphasis that is expecte d to lead to increased applications of superplastic-forming technology. Historically, there has been no universally accepted definition for super-plasticity.

Superplasticity is shown to be a universal phenomenon in materials ranging from metals and intermetallics to ceramics. Superplastic deformation facilitates the production of materials with.

This softcover edition now offers this wealth of information in one complete set of eleven volumes covering on more t pages the most important classes of materials: metals, ceramics, glasses, polymers, semiconductors, and composites.This book describes advances in the field of superplasticity.

This is the ability of certain Chapter 7 Fine-structure superplastic intermetallics Nickel-based intermetallic compounds Nickel silicide (Ni 3 Si) Superplasticity in metals and ceramics T.G. Nieh, J. Wadsworth and O.D. Sherby Frontmatter More information.‘Engineers can also readily mold or bend the materials at room temperature into various shapes, a property called superplasticity.’ ‘The scope of superplasticity has also broadened materials-wise, and now includes, in addition to metals: intermetallics, ceramics, bulk metallic glasses, nanostructured materials and composites.’.